Home Start Employment
Updated: 2016-08-04 16:32

Employment

Documents required for employment

  1. The employer is obliged to request that the person being hired would produce a document confirming his/her identity.

  2. Where labour laws relate the hiring to a certain educational attainment or vocational training or health condition, the employer is obliged to request that the person being hired would produce documents confirming the educational attainment or vocational training or health condition as the case may be; where a minor from fourteen to sixteen years of age is being hired, the birth certificate, a written consent of one of the parents or another statutory representative of the child and a written permission by a doctor in charge of the child’s health must be submitted; if the hiring takes place during the school year, a written consent of the child’s school must be presented. The employer has the right to request other statutory documents as well.

Examples of Curiculum Vitae

Example of Motivation letter

Example of application to employ (LT)

Example of Employment Contract (LT)

Employment relations are relations which arise from the contract and in which one party (the employee) performs a certain work function in accordance with the set working standards and internal working procedures and the other party (the employer) provides him/her with work as stipulated in the employment contract, guarantees the working conditions provided in the labour laws, the collective agreement and the employment contract, and pays a remuneration for work based on the amount and quality of work. 

Employment contract is an agreement between the employee and the employer whereby the employee undertakes to do a job in a certain profession, specialization and qualifications or to perform a certain function in accordance with the working procedures established by the employer and the employer undertakes to provide the employee with the work stipulated in the employment contract, pay the employee the agreed remuneration for work, and ensure the working conditions established in the labour laws and regulations and the collective agreement and agreed by the parties.

Employee is a natural person working under the employment contract for the agreed pay.

Employer is an enterprise, institution, organization or any other organizational structure irrespective of ownership, legal form or type and irrespective of type of activities. In addition, any natural person can be an employer.

The employer is responsible for the proper execution of the employment contract. The employer is obliged to request that the person being hired would produce a document confirming his/her identity and a state social security certificate.

Where labour laws relate the hiring to a certain educational attainment or vocational training or health condition, the employer is obliged to request that the person being hired would produce, apart from the aforesaid documents, the documents confirming the educational attainment or vocational training or health condition; where a minor from fourteen to sixteen years of age is being hired, the birth certificate, a written consent of one of the parents or another statutory representative of the child and a written permission by a doctor in charge of the child’s health must be submitted. The employer has the right to request other statutory documents as well.

Content of an employment contract is the terms and conditions of the employment contract agreed by the parties, defining the rights and obligations of the parties. Each employment contract must state the following mandatory conditions of contract:

  • place of work of the employee (enterprise, organization, structural division etc.);

  • work functions, i. e. a work requiring certain profession, specialization, qualifications or a certain position);

  • terms of payment for the work (wage system, size of pay, payment procedures etc.).

The parties may also agree on other conditions of the employment contract provided that this is not prohibited by the labour laws or regulations or the collective agreement.

An employment contract is deemed to be concluded after the parties agree on the terms and conditions of the contract. The employment contract must be concluded in writing in duplicate, using a model form of contract. The employment contract is signed by the employer, or a person authorized by him, and the employee. The employer retains a copy of the employment contract and hands the other copy to the employee. The employment contract must be registered in the employment contracts register on the date of its conclusion. Such registration is not mandatory in cases where the employer is a natural person who hires maximum three employees. Prior to starting work the employer must hand a copy of the employment contract and an employee’s ID document (‘employment certificate’) to the employee. The issue or replacement of the employment certificate is recorded in the employment certificates register.

The labour laws and regulations as well as collective agreements may establish that persons are appointed to certain positions on competition or elections basis or upon passing of qualifications examinations. At conclusion of the employment contract the parties may agree on a trial period.

Types of employment contracts:

  • open-ended;

  • fixed-term, temporary, seasonal;

  • for additional work or secondment;

  • for work from home;

  • for servicing;

  • other.

Fixed-term employment contracts may be concluded for a certain period or for a period of certain works but not longer than for five years. A fixed-term contract may not be concluded for works of permanent nature except for cases where this is required by the laws or collective agreements. Normally, open-ended employment contracts are concluded.

Seasonal employment contracts are concluded for the performance of seasonal works. Seasonal works include works which, due to natural and climatic conditions, are performed not throughout the year but in certain periods (seasons) not longer than eight months (within a period of consecutive twelve months) and which are on the list of seasonal works.

Temporary employment contracts are employment contracts for a period of maximum two months.  

Contracts for additional work and secondment. Unless prohibited by the law, the employee may occupy an additional position or perform certain additional works (not stipulated in the contract) for the same employer.

Employment contracts for work from home may stipulate that the employee will perform the contractual work function from home.

Servicing contracts are employment contracts whereby the employee undertakes to provide personal household services to the employer.

Other employment contracts may be concluded with workers in private farms and other economic entities or workers of special-purpose enterprises whose work can potentially cause disruptions in the entities operations leading to extremely serious consequences for people and the environment, as well as in other cases provided by the law.

Authorship agreements are concluded when the subject of agreement is an original creative work in the field of literature, science or art irrespective of its artistic value and method and from of expression. The copyright subjects and the provisions of authorship agreements are governed by the Republic of Lithuania Law on Copyright and Related Rights.  

Termination/expiry of employment contract

Grounds for termination of employment contract

Agreement of the parties

  • The employment contract may be terminated on proposal of either the employer or the employee.

  • The party receiving the proposal must notify its agreement or disagreement within 7 days.

  • Upon agreement on termination of the employment contract, the parties execute a written agreement stating the severance pay, the compensation for unused leave, the dismissal date, the terms of payment and other terms and conditions.

Expiry of contract

  • Both the employee and the employer has the right to terminate the employment contract upon expiry of the term of the fixed-term contract.

  • If the employment contract has expired but labour relations are actually continuing and neither of the parties has requested termination prior to expiry, it is deemed that the contract has been extended for an indefinite term (has become an open-ended contract).

  • Upon termination of the employment contract on the above grounds, no severance pay is due.

  • If the employment contract has not been renewed or has been terminated upon expiry of its term but, within one month from the date of termination, a fixed-term employment contract is concluded again with the same employer, then the employee may request that such contract would be recognized as a contract concluded for an indefinite term.

At employee’s request [not for valid reasons]

  • The employee has the right to terminate the employment contract by giving the employer a 14 days’ written notice (unless the collective agreement stipulates another term).

  • The employer must document the termination of the employment contract and settle up with the employee.

  • The employee shall have the right to recall his/her application for termination not later than within three days from the date of filing of the application. Afterwards the application can only be recalled with the employer’s consent.

  • No severance pay is due in case of termination of the employment contract on the above grounds.

At employee’s request [for valid reasons]

  • The employee has the right to terminate the open-ended or fixed-term employment contract by giving the employer a 3 days’ written notice if the application for termination is based on illness or disability of the employee or another valid reason stated in the collective agreement, or if the employer fails to discharge his obligations under the employment contract or has violated the laws or the collective agreement.

  • Furthermore, the employee has the right to terminate an open-ended employment contract by giving the employer a 3 working days’ notice if he/she is already entitled to full old-age pension or is receiving it.

  • In such cases the employment contract is terminated from the date specified in the employee‘s application.

  • A severance pay amounting to the employee‘s average monthly pay for two months must be paid to the employee.

  • The employee has the right to recall the employment contract not later than within three days from the application submission date. Thereafter the application may only be recalled with the employer‘s consent.

Circumstances beyond control of the employee

  • The employee is entitled to terminate the employment contract if:

    • idle time is lasting for more than 30 consecutive days or has totalled over 60 days during the past twelve months;

    •  the employee has not received full pay for more than 2 consecutive months;

  • A severance pay amounting to the employee‘s average monthly pay for two months must be paid to the employee.

  • The employment contract is terminated from the date stated in the employee’s application but not earlier than on expiry of three days after the application filing date.

On the employer’s initiative with no fault of the employee

  • The employer may terminate an open-ended employment contract only for valid reasons related to the employee’s qualifications, professional competences or conduct at work or for economic or production reasons or due to structural reorganization etc.

  • Dismissal of the employee is permitted provided that transferring him/her to another job with his/her consent is impossible.

  • An employment contract with an employee for whom not more than five years have left until pension entitlement, who is under eighteen, who is disabled, or who is raising a child  under fourteen years of age  is permitted only in exceptional cases, where retaining the employee would  mean a substantial breach of the employer’s interests.

  • The employer must give the employee a two months’ or a four months’ written notice.

  • The employee must grant the employee free time for the search for a new job (at least 10% of the working time norm).

  • The employees who have been elected to employee representation bodies may not be dismissed during the period for which they have been elected unless the representation body gives its prior consent. The collective agreement may stipulate that this guarantee applies to other employees as well.

  • Upon termination of employment contract the employee receives a severance pay the size of which is determined according to Article 140(1) of the LC taking account of the employee’s uninterrupted record of service with the employer (the employee’s average monthly pay for 1 to 6 months). ​

Termination of the employment contract without warning

  • The Labour Code provides for cases when an employment contract can be terminated without warning (e. g. the employee has committed a gross violation of his work functions or work discipline, performs his duties without due care, is convicted etc.).

  • No severance pay is payable to the employee except for cases when there is no fault of the employee. In the latter case the size of the severance pay is established according to Article 140(2) of the LC.

Priority right to retain employment

Such right is vested in the employees who:

  • were injured or came down with an occupational disease at workplace;

  • are single parents with children (adopted children) under sixteen years of age or care for other family members with severe or medium disability or with less than 55% ability-for-work level, or family members who have reached the old-pension age and for whom high or medium-level special needs have been identified according to the procedure prescribed by the laws;

  • have at least ten years uninterrupted service record with the employer except employees who have become entitled to full old-age pension or are already receiving it;

  • for whom not more than 3 years have remained until old-age pension;

  • for whom such entitlement is established in the collective agreement;

  • who have been elected to the employee representation bodies. ​

Trial period upon conclusion of the employment contract

A trial period may be agreed by the parties at conclusion of the employment contract. The trial period may be established in order to verify whether the employee is fit for the agreed work or, at the newly hired employee’s request, whether the work fits the employee. The trial clause is included in the employment contract.

All labour laws are fully applicable to the employee during the trial period.

No trial period is set in order to verify fitness for work when

  1. a person under eighteen years of age is hired;

  2. the hiring is conducted on a competition or election basis or upon passing of qualifications examinations for the position;

  3. the employee is transferred to another employer by employers’ agreement;

  4. in other cases provided in labour laws.

Trial period is a period set by agreement of the parties to the employment contract at conclusion thereof, during which the employer can verify whether the employee is fit for the agreed work and the employee can make sure that the job and its conditions are suitable for him/her. Thus the content of the parties’ agreement on a trial period consists of both the term and the purpose of the trial (i. e. on which party’s initiative the trial period has been established). Therefore, upon parties’ agreement on the trial period, the written employment contract should state, in addition to the duration of the trial period, the purpose (initiator) of the trial period.  If the employment contract does not specify on whose initiative the trial period has been set, this should be deemed to be a wrong practice not consistent with the legal regulation provided in Article 105(1) of the LC. In case if only the duration of the trial period is specified in the employment contract, this does not invalidate the trial clause and does not mean that the trial clause has not been agreed at all. By failing to specify the purpose of the trial period in the employment contract, the employer fails to perform the duty, set for the employer in Article 99(3) of the LC, to duly draw up the employment contract as in such a case not all the key elements of the agreement on the trial period are specified, and in the event of a dispute this clause should be interpreted for the benefit of the employee (i. e. that the trial period has been set as the employee wished to know whether the job would suit him/her) unless the employer proves otherwise.

The trial period may not be longer than three months. This prohibiting provision of the labour law is an imperative one, therefore, parties to the employment contract have no opportunities for agreeing on a longer period or for extending it.  In order to verify, in the cases prescribed by the law, whether the employee is fit for the agreed work, the trial period may be longer but not exceeding six months. It should be noted that a period longer than three months can be established only by the law. This means that if a special law does not provide for a trial period longer than three months, the employer is prohibited from setting a longer period in the employment contract. All labour laws are applicable to the employer during the trial period, therefore, it is deemed that the employment contract takes effect on the moment of conclusion thereof. The trial clause in the employment contract is just one of the additional clauses of the contract. This clause determines a simpler employment contract termination procedure rather than the validity of the employment contract, i. e. in case if the trial period is set on the initiative of the employer, then the employer having recognized that the trial results are unsatisfactory may dismiss the employee prior to the end of the trial period by giving him/her a three days’ notice and may not pay the severance pay. If the trial period expires and the employee continues working, the employment contract may only be terminated on the grounds established in Articles 124-129 and 136 of the LC, in accordance with the termination procedure set for the employment contracts in Chapter 4, Section XII of the Labour Code.

A decision on the employee’s fitness for work is adopted on expiry of the trial period; if a new employment contract is concluded with a new trial period, such contract is to be deemed the continuation of the previous open-ended employment contract.

Negative results of the trial period form the basis for the dismissal of the employee. According to the linguistic interpretation of this legal provision, only the employer may assess the trial results. This may be concluded upon evaluation of the terms agreed by the parties in the employment contract, i. e. depending on who has initiated the trial period. In the case under consideration, the trial period was set on the initiative of the employer, therefore, the employer can decide at his own discretion. In case of a dispute between the employee and the employer on the basis of Article 107(1) of the LC, the burden of proof lies with the employer. The employer has the right to recognize that the employee has not passed the trial. Such recognition is deemed to be justified and lawful if the employer presents specific evidence proving that the employee did not perform his/her work properly during the trial period. One may conclude that this employer prevents arbitrariness on the part of the employer, i. e. does not allow termination of the contract without any justification and evidence proving that the employee has failed to cope with the work, therefore, he/she is not fit for it. 

Having regard to the equality of the parties to the employment contract, the employee has the right to contest his/her dismissal on the grounds of Article 107(1) of the Labour Code, and in this case the employer must prove that the employee has actually failed the trial, i. e. that the employee is not capable or able to perform the agreed work due to his /her professional or personal qualities. The employer may prove the negative result of the trial   by any means of proving listed in Article 177 of CCP. Therefore, the duty of the court in   trying such cases is to verify whether the employer had sufficient grounds for recognizing that the employee had failed the trial. Such recognition is deemed to be justified and is lawful if the employer provides specific evidence confirming that the employee did not perform the work properly during the trial period.

Collective labour relations

Collective labour relations is one of the focus areas of the Labour Code. This is because participants in the labour relations are not equal: no matter how highly qualified and educated is the employee, he/she is always weaker compared with the employer.

The subjects of collective labour relations and their representatives agree on their interests and resolve disputes through negotiations. Collective agreements can be of the following types:

  • state-level (national) collective agreement;

  • collective agreement concluded on branch level (production, services, professionals) or territorial level (municipal, county);

  • collective agreement concluded on the level of an enterprise (institution, organisation) or its structural division.

National, branch and territorial collective agreements are written agreement concluded between trade union organisations (amalgamation, federation, centre etc.) and employer organisations (association, federation, confederation etc.).

Branch collective agreements establish the lines of socio-economic development of the relevant branch, the terms of work organization and remuneration as well as social guarantees for the employees (professional groups).

Territorial collective agreements establish the conditions for the resolution of certain labour, social and economic problems that have territorial peculiarities. 

Enterprise collective agreements are written agreements between the employer and the collective of the employees concerning working conditions, terms of remuneration for work, and other social and economic conditions. Such agreements are concluded at enterprises, institutions and organisations of all types and apply to all the employees of the entity.

In an enterprise collective agreement, the parties establish the working, professional and socio-economic conditions and guarantees which are not regulated by the laws and other legal acts or the national/branch/territorial collective agreement or which are not in contravention of the latter and do not deteriorate the employees’ position.

Work record

Work record is a period during which a person was a party to the labour relations governed by the Labour Code as well as other periods which must be included in the work record under the relevant regulations or collective agreements and for which certain work-related rights or additional guarantees and privileges are established in the labour laws and regulations and collective agreements. The work record is classified as follows:

  1. general work record including all the periods when a person was a party to labour relations as well as other periods permitted to be included in the work record;

  2. special work record including the periods when a person performed work in a certain profession or specialization or occupied a certain position or worked under certain conditions, and periods permitted to be included in the work record of this type;

  3. work record at a certain enterprise, institution or organization which includes the period worked for such employer, and periods permitted to be included in the work record of this type. The work record is not affected by a change in the owner, subordination, founder or name of the enterprise, institution or organization, or their merger, split, division or joining to another enterprise, institution or organization;

  4. uninterrupted work record is the period worked at an enterprise, institution or organization or several enterprises, institutions or organizations if the person was transferred from one employer to another by the employers’ agreement or on other grounds without interruption of the work record, or if a break in such employment does not exceed the set period.

  5. The procedure for the determination of the work record defined in paragraphs 2, 3 and 4 of this Article at enterprises, institutions and organisations financed from the state budget or municipal budgets is established by the Government; for other employers – by collective agreements.

Working time

Working time is the period during which the employee is obliged to perform his/her work and other periods considered to be equivalent to that period.

Working time may not exceed forty hours per week. The daily duration of the working time may not exceed eight working hours. Exceptions may be established in the laws, Government resolutions and collective agreements. The maximum working time including overtime may not exceed forty eight hours.

On the eve of a state holiday the duration of the working day is reduced by one hour except for employees who work part-time. In case of a six-day working week, the working day before the day-off may not exceed five hours. 

Rest time

Rest time is the time free from work as established in the law, collective agreement or employment agreement. Annual leave is one of the types of the rest time.

Annual leave is a period counted in calendar days that is granted for an employee for resting and recovering of his/her ability-for-work, while the employee retains his/her job/position and receives the average pay. State holidays are not included in the leave period. The annual leave is classified as minimal, extended and additional annual leave.

Duration of the minimal annual leave is twenty eight calendar days. An annual leave of thirty five calendar days is granted to:

  • employees under eighteen years of age;

  • employees who are single parents raising a child under fourteen or a disabled child under eighteen years of age;

  • disabled employees;

  • other persons as established by the law.

An annual leave extended until fifty eight calendar days is granted to workers of certain categories whose work is related to increased nervous, emotional or mental stress or professional risk as well as to employees with specific working conditions. The list of such worker categories is approved by the Government, with the specific length of extended annual holidays established for each category.

Additional annual leave may be granted:

  • to persons working under conditions that are not normal working conditions;

  • for uninterrupted service record of many years with the same employer;

  • for works of extraordinary kind.​

Main articles of the labour law governing working conditions for parents

Guarantees to pregnant women and employees raising children

The employer may not terminate an employment contract with a pregnant women from the date on which a medical certificate of pregnancy was submitted to the employer plus one month following the expiry of the pregnancy and child-birth leave, except for a temporary work contract upon expiry of its term.

Part time

Part time work with a shorter working day or a shorter working week is established:

  1. by agreement between the employee and the employer;

  2. at the employee’s request due to his/her health condition, based on a conclusion of a medical establishment;

  3. at the request of a pregnant woman, a woman who has recently given birth (a mother who has submitted to the employer a certificate of child-birth issued by a healthcare establishment and is in a child care leave until the child becomes one year of age, hereinafter referred to as the ‘women who have recently given birth’), a breast-feeding woman (a mother who has submitted to the employer a certificate issued by a healthcare establishment stating that she is raising and breastfeeding a child, hereinafter referred to as the ‘breastfeeding women’), an employee raising a child under three years of age, and an employee – a single parent raising a child under fourteen or a disabled child under eighteen years of age;

  4. at the request of an employee who is under eighteen years of age;

  5. at the request of a disabled employee based on a conclusion issued by the Services for Establishing Disability and Ability-for-Work under the Ministry of Social Security and Labour;

  6. at the request of an employee who is carer for a family member, based on a conclusion issued by a healthcare establishment.

Unless otherwise stated in the conclusion issued by a healthcare establishment, part time work may be established by reducing the number of working days in a week or by shortening a working day/shift, or both. Part time work may be divided in parts during a working day. Other conditions related to the duration of part time work are established by the Government. A collective agreement may stipulate that the conditions established by the Government do not apply.

Limiting of overtime work

  1. Any work performed while exceeding the duration of the working time established in Article 144(1), Article 145, Article 146 and Article 149 (1) and (2) of this Labour Code is deemed to be overtime work.

  2. An employer may assign overtime works only in exceptional cases defined in Article 151 of this Labour Code. In other cases, overtime work may be organised only subject to a written consent of the employee or upon receipt of a written application of the employee.

  3. Overtime work is not permitted for: persons under eighteen years of age and persons who study at secondary and vocational schools without interrupting work – during the school days; when factors in the working environment exceed the allowable values, and in other cases established by the law and collective agreements.

  4. Pregnant women, women who have recently given birth, breastfeeding women, employees raising a child under three years of age, employees – single parents raising a child under fourteen or a disabled child under eighteen, and disabled employees may be assigned overtime work only subject to their consent. In addition, disabled persons may be assigned overtime work provided this is not prohibited by the conclusion issued by the Services for Establishing Disability and Ability-for-Work under the Ministry of Social Security and Labour.

  5. Work of administration officers exceeding the set working time is not considered overtime. The list of such positions is established in the collective agreement or internal work regulations.

Night work

Night work is the calendar period from ten p. m. until six a. m.

  1. A work is considered to be night work if three working hours fall within the night time. The night work is shorter by one hour.

  2. Night work is prohibited for persons under eighteen years of age and for employees for whom working at night is prohibited by the conclusion issued by a healthcare establishment.

  3. Disabled persons, provided that this is not prohibited by the conclusion issued by the Services for Establishing Disability and Ability-for-Work under the Ministry of Social Security and Labour, pregnant women, women who have recently given birth, breastfeeding women, employees raising a child under three years of age, employees – single parents raising a child under fourteen or a disabled child under eighteen, may be assigned night work only subject to their consent.

  4. The duration of night work is not shortened in case of uninterrupted production as well in cases where the employee has been hired for night work under the employment contract.

  5. Employees working at night have free health checks according to the procedure established by the Government as well as at the employee’s request (if the employee has complaints concerning night work). Should it be established that night work has damaged or can damage the employee’s health, the employer must transfer the employee to a daytime job based on the conclusion issued by a healthcare establishment.

Work on duty

  1. In exceptional cases when it is necessary to ensure certain working procedures or guarantee the performance of urgent works, the employer may assign to an employee, not more often than once in a month, or not more often than once in a week at the employee’s request, a job on duty either at work or at home after working hours or during days off and holidays.

  2. The time on duty at work together with the duration of the working day/shift (when the work on duty follows the working day/shift) may not exceed the set duration of the working day/shift, whereas the time on duty at work during days off and holidays and the time on duty at home may not exceed eight hours during a twenty-four hour period. Working on duty at work is deemed to be equivalent to the working time and working on duty at home is deemed to be equivalent to at least one half of the working time.

  3. Where the duration of the working time is exceeded, the employee must receive for his/her work on duty, during the nearest month, a rest period the duration of which must be equal to the period on duty at work or the period on duty equivalent to the working time (for working on duty at home), or, at the employee’s request, this rest period may be added to the annual leave or the employee is paid for at overtime rates.

  4. Persons under eighteen years of age may not be assigned works on duty either at work or at home. Pregnant women, women who have recently given birth, breastfeeding women, employees raising a child under three years of age, employees – single parents raising a child under fourteen or a disabled child under eighteen, persons who are carers of a disabled person, and disabled persons, provided that this is not prohibited by the conclusion issued by the Services for Establishing Disability and Ability-for-Work under the Ministry of Social Security and Labour, may be assigned work on duty at work or at home only subject to their consent.

Weekly uninterrupted rest

  1. Sunday is the general day off for all employees; in case of a five-day working week – Saturday and Sunday except for the cases established in paragraphs 2, 3 and 4 of this Article and in other regulations.

  2. Rest days for enterprises and organisations which must continue working on the general day off due to the public service functions (public transport, healthcare institutions, energy supply enterprises, theatres, museums etc.) are established by the executive municipal body.

  3. At enterprises and organisations which cannot stop works due to technical conditions of production or due to uninterrupted public service, as well at other enterprises operating without interruption the rest days may be granted to employees on other days of the week according to work/shift schedules consecutively for each group of workers.

  4. Under a summary work accounting system, employees are granted rest days according to work/shift schedules.

  5. A weekly uninterrupted rest period must last at least thirty five hours. Both days off must be consecutive days.

  6. It is prohibited to assign work during the days off, except for such works which cannot be stopped due to technical conditions of production (enterprises and organisations that operate uninterruptedly), works necessary for public services and urgent repairs and handling works. Pregnant women, women who have recently given birth, breastfeeding women, employees raising a child under three years of age, employees – single parents raising a child under fourteen or a disabled child under eighteen, and persons under eighteen years of age may be assigned work during days off only subject to their consent.

Child care leave until the child becomes three years of age

  1. Depending on the family’s choice, the mother (foster mother), father (foster father), grandmother, grandfather or other relatives who are actually raising the child as well as the employee who has been appointed guardian of the child, is granted a child care leave until the child becomes three years of age. The leave may be used as a whole or in parts. The employees entitled to such leave may take it in turn.

  2. An employee intending to make use of such leave or to return to work prior to the end of the leave must give the employer a fourteen days’ written notice. The collective agreement may stipulate a longer warning period.

Additional privileges for persons raising children

An employee who is raising a disabled child under eighteen or two children until twelve years of age is granted an additional day off per month (or the working time is reduced by two hours per week), and an employee who is raising three or more children under twelve years of age is granted two days per month (or the working time is reduced by four hours per week), with the average pay retained by the employee.